How 'Shubrak', the horse of Mewar prince, killed Qutubuddin Aibak?

The first ruler of Slave Dynasty in Delhi Sultanate Qutubuddin Aibak died due to falling off from a running horse.

But is it really possible that an army general who first rode a horse in the age 11 and fought countless battles on riding horses can die from falling from a horse?

Real history vs false concocted story -

When Qutubuddin Aibak looted the Rajputana, he killed the king of Mewar and imprisoned his Prince Karn Singh. And along with the looted wealth and prince, he also carried Prince’s horse Shubhrak to Lahore.

In Lahore, once Prince decided to run away and got caught in that process. Qutubuddin ordered to behead the Prince and to increase the disgrace, to play a Polo Match with the dead Prince’s head.

On the day of beheading, Qutubuddin arrived at the venue riding on the Shubhrak horse. Shubhrak instantly recognized his master Karn Singh and started crying/braying seeing him.

Within a few seconds, Shubhrak became uncontrollable and threw Qutubuddin to the ground. Without allowing him to defend, Shubhrak started hitting his chest and head area with his mighty hooves continuously. After 12–15 powerful hits by a horse, Qutubuddin Aibak died on the spot.

Every single person stunned seeing that. The whole army marched to kill the horse and the Prince. But like a lightning, Shubhrak ran towards his master Karn Singh and when Prince sat on him, he started to run the most difficult journey of his life.

He ran and ran and ran continuosly for 3 days and stopped at the gates of Mewar Kingdom. When Prince Karn Singh came down from the saddle, Shubhrak stood still like a statue.

When Karn Singh rubbed his hands on Shubhrak’s head, he fell to the ground.

He was successful to save his master and to escort him safely to his kingdom before dying.

We have read about Chetak many times but this horse’s story is beyond faithfulness!

Things like these never becomes a part of syllabus in our modern education system.

Most of us haven’t heard that name. Have we?

Source: fb.com/pankaj.dixit.3958/posts/1161319717367906

1 Like

When nothing is written anywhere, all of sudden how surely you got this incident ?? Please inform the source of your information to “Authenticate” this.

A good read, indeed! It’s heartening to learn about Shubhrak. There are several such stories of might and valour, successfully suppressed by modern historians. Yes, this must be the part of syllabus in our modern education system, but who will bell the cat?